Northern Scandinavia

Northern Scandinavia

 

Or really Fennoscandia

 

 

Most of my "bushcrafting" takes place in the tree northern regions of Norway; Nordland, Troms and Finnmark. But I also visit northern Sweden and Finland on occations.

 

I live in Bodø, Nordland, but I am born and (mostly) raised in Vesterålen, just North of the Lofoten islands.

 

Although the area lies north of the Arctic Circle (66°33¨North) the climate is not arctic. Due to the Gulf Stream the climate is more temperate.

 

Winters along the coast tend to be mild, with -2° Celsius average winter temperature in the Lofoten islands.

 

The inland is a bit colder. Average temperature in Finnmarksvidda December to February is -16 degrees (lowest -51.4° Celsius in Karasjok, 1886).

 

Summer temperatures are less varied.

Average temperature in the lowland and Finnmarksvidda is 10° Celsius.

The mountains of Troms are lowest with average temperature of 6° Celsius.

Highest temperature recorded was in Siccajavri, Finnmark County; with 34.3° Celsius (this place actually has the lowest average temperature during a year with -3° Celsius).

 

The landscape is mostly alpine with few large flat areas. Largest flat area is Finnmarksvidda.

 

The Birch (Betula) is the most widespread and common three.

Large areas of Pine (Pinus sylvestris) forest are also found.

 

Among other threes found in the region are Rowan (Sorbus aucuparia), Willow (Salix), Alder (Alnus), Aspen (Populus tremula) and Bird Cherry (Prunus padus).

 

Although not native you will also find large areas of Spruce (Picea abies), but this is mostly planted forests.

 

In FennoScandinavia (Norway, Sweden and Finland) we also have the right to roam, or “Allemannsretten”, which give us the right to move freely around, camp, and pick berries or mushrooms.

 

Fishing in fresh water in Norway is licensed though. But a license for all public land (Norway) could be purchased on the internet or at the local post offices.

 

Private owned lakes and rivers are mostly licensed locally, although many lakes aren’t regulated at all.

 

Fishing in salt water in Norway is free for all.

 

 

In Norway there is a general fire ban between 15.April and 15.September, but this law is seen upon as a guide rather than an absolute law.

Usually the ground is still snow covered in the woods during April and May in the north.